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Thursday, August 13

  1. page Using Film literacy against Racism edited Introduction: media's influence on our lives. ... (qtd. in Kellner Keller and Share ... th…

    Introduction: media's influence on our lives.
    ...
    (qtd. in KellnerKeller and Share
    ...
    this diversity everydayevery day in our
    ...
    one another. TheThis understanding of race and culture is the operating form
    ...
    civil democracy centers aroundand is centered on this unity; a unity thatunity, which keeps us
    ...
    with respect. AdolescenceTeens are in
    ...
    with media everyday,every day, and there
    ...
    mass media.
    We are surrounded with technology in this modern era. As adults we will come into contact with technology in some sort of manner. Even more specifically, we are in an age of media. What is even more astonishing is the amount of media intake adolescent of this and the next generation experience. Media shapes our culture. It shapes what we perceive, how we define ourselves, and how we live. With this influx of media, there is influence that coincides with it. According to Mastro and Greenberg, “Cultivation theory assumes that portrayals are so frequent as to be unavoidable, and their frequency, one will be comparatively invariant of presentations of attributes” (700).When looking at Media literacy, it is essential to be able to analyze the unavoidable messages that teenagers face each time they turn on the T.V. In Digital and Media Literacy Renee Hobbs states, “an important dimension of the literary universe is the capacity to analyze messages, considering the author's, purpose, and point of view to understand how they are constructed and the assumptions that underpin them” (14). It is this ability to analyze messages that establishes critical thinking and discussion that, as Hobbs explains, “encourag[es] true dialogue that is necessary for civic action” (Digital and Media Literacy 19).
    ...
    believe racism and sexism is wrong
    ...
    but because itracism is wrong in itself.intrinsically wrong. In order
    Historical Racism in the Media
    ...
    Literacy combats racism and sexism,racism, we have
    Here are a few:
    The Birth of a Nation (1915). A fundamental film that, according to Wilson, Gutierrex, and Chao was an essential influence for the portrayal of American Blacks as inferior (69). It is also consider a master piece in cinema due to it being a landmark in cinema.
    ...
    I love Lucy ( 1951-1957): Desi Arnaz was one of the biggest television personality during this era; however, due to being a minority, his “Latin temperament, which exploded into a torrent of Spanish diatribe was classic imagery” (Clint c. Wilson II, Felix Gutierrez, and Lena M. Chao 88).
    https://video.search.yahoo.com/video/play;_ylt=A2KLqIOEkKVVCzIALOT7w8QF;_ylu=X3oDMTByNDY3bGRuBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDdmlkBHZ0aWQDBGdwb3MDNQ--?p=i+love+lucy+ricky+gets+annoyed&vid=7d22d7b248ec0af3a05b1ad392182dd9&turl=http%3A%2F%2Fts4.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DWN.3cX1XuYUPJniCCFouVo%252bRA%26pid%3D15.1%26h%3D225%26w%3D300%26c%3D7%26rs%3D1&rurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Dg10jFL423ho&tit=I+love+Lucy%3A+english+Pronunciation&c=4&h=225&w=300&l=325&sigr=11b06b0pq&sigt=112bon3n4&sigi=12m6cfaas&age=1356742846&fr2=p%3As%2Cv%3Av&fr=yfp-t-250-s&tt=b
    ...
    decade centered aroundon an “oversimplified
    {Screen Shot 2015-07-14 at 6.47.17 PM.png}
    Shaft (1971): Begun the era of “blaxploitation” that threatened the Black image as a militant position. It was Hollywood’s attempt to “purge its conscience as urban Blacks took revenge against Whites” (Clint c. Wilson II, Felix Gutierrez, and Lena M. Chao 80).
    ...
    1990’s: There were an equal distribution of roles given to blacks, but they were “found to be more provocatively dressed and unprofessional than their White counterparts ( Mastro, Greenberg, 336)
    How does the Media create Stereotypes?
    The way way we
    {Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 4.18.57 PM.png}
    ...
    more modern definition,definition of stereotypes, according to
    ...
    American Heritage dictionarydictionary, is defined as a
    ...
    find in Mass Mediamass media is the
    What's the Big Deal?
    ...
    symbols, we can notcannot always rely
    How does Film Literacy help analyze stereotypes?
    {Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 4.30.33 PM.png}
    ...
    as, “the capacitycapacities to access,
    ...
    film analysis helpshelp them apply
    Media Literacy is essential to properly inform against racial stereotypes because of the way audience perceive information from the Media. Though Media Literacy is complex and requires much attention, Renee Hobbs gives five core concepts for Media Literacy in Reading the Media: Media Literacy in High School English. These concepts, according to Hobbs are, "linked to ideas from film study, semiotics, media studies, and cultural studies" (41)
    1.) All Media messages are constructed.
    ...
    Think of all the times you’ve watched the food network and thought to yourself, “man, I’m really hungry now.” This is because Media is such an influential form of communication, and it holds persuasive power that can affect society. As Wilson II, Gutierrez, and Chao put it, “ the effects of the media on members of society have found that the influence of the media is large and complex...the audience is a complex set of groups and individuals who actively make decisions about which media to use, what to remember from the media, and how to interpret what they remember” (40). This influence means that, tentatively, the populace will not be automatically changed by information given to them by the media, but it does shape their perceptions and interpretation. These perceptions and interpretations is then how the individual will apply it to the real world. Media Literacy is then a close reading of the media messages, and how it affects our views as a society. Analyzing a diverse range of text helps students to analyze and discuss the “truthfulness” of images and portrayals of race. Rothenberg states, "Students who have learned to see issues of race, class, and gender in their experience and to identify hidden messages and implicit perspectives in the way 'reality' is constructed are well equipped to continue to think critically about the changing terrain of dominance and subordination" (69).
    How do we Use Media Literacy against Racism?
    ...
    of various raceraces is an
    Activity #1: Addressing the issue by Discussion.
    The first component is to begin to discuss student's’ view on race and various culture in the media. Hobbs states, “Listening and asking questions are the most important practices that activate critical thinking in the high school classroom” (Digital and Media Literacy 33). Understanding students’ views allows teachers to distance from their authoritative perception of what to believe. It allows students to articulate their understanding, their lack of experience, and their desire to learn. Establishing this mode of critical thinking is an essential step to autonomous thinking about accurate depiction of race and stereotypes in the media. Rothenberg states, "if educators avoid discussing issues around race, class, and gender, there will be little hope of coming close to working toward a just and equitable society" (qtd. in Kaa Vonia Hinton 63).
    ...
    3.) How have your attitudes been shaped towards race and skin color by shows and other media forms?
    Activity #3: Analyzing Stereotypes in Ads.
    ...
    so there areis much argumentsargument surrounding the
    ...
    and stereo types:
    types:

    1.) what is a stereotypes?
    2.) What are your experience with stereo types
    ...
    Literary connection: To Kill a MockingBird
    Though this is a classic novel addressing civil rights issues, and the movie, there are still racial stereotypes and issues of racism that, though is more intense due relative to the historical context, can still be seen in the depiction of race in mainstream media. Read the book and analyze the individual characters.
    ...
    and his friends.friends?
    2.) Analyze the perception of the racist, Bob Ewell, Link Deas, Mr. Walter Cunningham.
    Are there any similarities/contrast in the perception of the characters in Six Degrees of Separation? Explain.
    (view changes)
    3:19 pm

Wednesday, August 12

  1. page Using Film literacy against Racism edited Introduction: media's influence on our lives. Dewey (1997) ... rich diversity. Diversity exp…

    Introduction: media's influence on our lives.
    Dewey (1997)
    ...
    rich diversity. Diversity experiencedWe experience this diversity everyday in our everyday life and seensee it in the
    We are surrounded with technology in this modern era. As adults we will come into contact with technology in some sort of manner. Even more specifically, we are in an age of media. What is even more astonishing is the amount of media intake adolescent of this and the next generation experience. Media shapes our culture. It shapes what we perceive, how we define ourselves, and how we live. With this influx of media, there is influence that coincides with it. According to Mastro and Greenberg, “Cultivation theory assumes that portrayals are so frequent as to be unavoidable, and their frequency, one will be comparatively invariant of presentations of attributes” (700).When looking at Media literacy, it is essential to be able to analyze the unavoidable messages that teenagers face each time they turn on the T.V. In Digital and Media Literacy Renee Hobbs states, “an important dimension of the literary universe is the capacity to analyze messages, considering the author's, purpose, and point of view to understand how they are constructed and the assumptions that underpin them” (14). It is this ability to analyze messages that establishes critical thinking and discussion that, as Hobbs explains, “encourag[es] true dialogue that is necessary for civic action” (Digital and Media Literacy 19).
    ...
    do this, we must teach the next generation must be taught how to
    Historical Racism in the Media
    When looking at how Media Literacy combats racism and sexism, we have to look at why it should be used. Essentially, media has formulated the way we perceive minorities which establishes stereotypes in our minds. The value of approaching these films with a critical analysis is because it helps to dissect what "truth" is being portrayed. As Rothenberg states, "To adopt this approach to multiculturalism is to return to its earliest incarnation as a radical way of interrogating traditional knowledge in order to expose the way in which a particular point of view had been constructed as 'truth' throughout much of recent history" (68). The past hundred years of media has conveyed a message about minorities. Because of this message, the general populace has unconsciously accepted portrayals of minorities as "truth", and applied them to society. Looking at how minorities have been displayed throughout media is a venue of discovery in how we have developed stereotypes and fighting against it with critical thinking.
    ...
    How does Film Literacy help analyze stereotypes?
    {Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 4.30.33 PM.png}
    ...
    analysis. As Ing writes,Kellner and Share write, “Critical media
    Media Literacy is essential to properly inform against racial stereotypes because of the way audience perceive information from the Media. Though Media Literacy is complex and requires much attention, Renee Hobbs gives five core concepts for Media Literacy in Reading the Media: Media Literacy in High School English. These concepts, according to Hobbs are, "linked to ideas from film study, semiotics, media studies, and cultural studies" (41)
    1.) All Media messages are constructed.
    ...
    In Reading the Media: Media Literacy in High School English, Postman states, “media literacy reflects the acknowledge task of the schools to assist the young in interpreting the symbols of their culture (qtd. in Hobbs 6). It is no doubt that learning to interpret the symbols of various race is an essential element in living intelligently in a diverse society. When Students think about the various races represented on Television and Film, it is important that they learn to interpret it correctly as they interact with the plethora of cultures in reality. According to David Buckingham, “very different conceptions of morality and very different cultural traditions exist side-by-side” (qtd. in Reading the Media Hobbs 29). Using Literacy to analyze and write about how race is represented, how it deviates from the truth, and how it should represent different cultures, is an essential element to train students to play a healthy, active role in society.
    Activity #1: Addressing the issue by Discussion.
    ...
    (qtd. in oKaaKaa Vonia Hinton
    {Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 4.55.51 PM.png}
    Transition by reading the Boston Globe article Skin Tone and Racial Stereo Types by Gareth Cook. A link to it can be found here: {Boston Globe article.pdf}
    ...
    Activity #2: Addressing the issue by film analysis
    {Screen Shot 2015-08-04 at 9.52.34 AM.png}
    1.) Use Symbol Tally Sheet.Soapstone to help students analyze, map, and compare the film. (Golden 165).
    TitleFilm
    Object
    #
    of Visual
    References
    #
    Of Dialogue References
    Literal Meaning
    Metaphorical Meaning
    83).
    SOAPStone Chart
    Subject: Paraphrase the text
    Occasion: What are the issues involved? What are the racial issues at play?
    Audience: To Whom needs to hear/watch this? How do you know?
    Purpose: What is the point or the message of this piece?
    Speaker: Who is the speaker? What can you say about the speaker's age. situation, social class, etc?
    Tone: What is the attitude of the speaker to the subject? What words reveal this?
    Analysis: Choose one or more of the elements above and explain them with supporting examples, and/or contrast them with another text.

    Use activity to look for not only racial symbols, but literary symbols as a whole. Allow student to analyze the piece first as literature, but keep in mind the distinct racial and class symbols. These allows them to filter and apply these skills as a cross-discipline for other forms of media
    1.) Have students map in their Notebook the story of Paul with these questions and thoughts in mind to help them write.
    *what is his journey through various communities?
    *how do the the various communities in the film perceive the minority?
    *how far/similar is his experience from reality?
    *how accurate is the director's view in regards to the depiction of the minority?
    2.) Throughout the film and discussion have students keep a journal. Allow the students to write in the journal how they have perceived various races in media and in their lives. If students feel comfortable, allow them to read it out loud. The activity of writing helps students, "reflect on their experiences consuming media...[it] encourage[s] students to broaden their reading about topics related to the course and reflect upon their media use at home" (Reading the Media Hobbs 82).

    Activity # 3: addressing the issue through post viewing discussion:
    After the film, analyze the perceptions of race with these questions by KaaVonia Hinton
    ...
    2. How do characters resist race, class, and gender oppression?
    3. How do characters express a philosophy of liberation by assisting and encouraging themselves and others in efforts to prevail over multiple oppressions (racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, and so forth)?
    Have1.) Have students map in their notebook the story of Paul with these questions and thoughts in mind to help them write.
    *what is his journey through various communities?
    *how do the various communities in the film perceive the minority?
    *how far/similar is his experience from reality?
    *how accurate is the director's view in regards to the depiction of the minority?
    2.) Throughout the film and discussion have students keep a journal. Allow the students to write in the journal how they have perceived various races in media and in their lives. If students feel comfortable, allow them to read it out loud. The activity of writing helps students, "reflect on their experiences consuming media...[it] encourage[s] students to broaden their reading about topics related to the course and reflect upon their media use at home" (Reading the Media Hobbs 82).
    3.) Have
    students write
    ...
    analysis skills asis an effective
    Activity #5: Connecting symbols to literature.
    As a post-viewing activity
    ...
    Literary connection: To Kill a MockingBird
    Though this is a classic novel addressing civil rights issues, and the movie, there are still racial stereotypes and issues of racism that, though is more intense due relative to the historical context, can still be seen in the depiction of race in mainstream media. Read the book and analyze the individual characters.
    ...
    Are there inany similarities/contrast between
    2.) Analyze the perception of the racist, Bob Ewell, Link Deas, Mr. Walter Cunningham.
    Are there any similarities/contrast in the perception of the characters in Six Degrees of Separation? Explain.
    3.) Analyze the characters and perceptions of Scout and Atticus Finch, Boo Radley, Dill Harris, and Heck Tate.
    What are the similarities between these characters and the characters in the film, Ouisa Kittredge, Flan Kittredge and their social class of friends? How do their perceptions of Paul differ from the Atticus's family's perception of Tom Robinson. What changes for the characters of Ouisa, Flan, and how they perceive and accept Paul?
    Using Media Literacy to detect Stereotypes or racial misrepresentation in advertisement.
    Discuss what students think and believe are racial stereotypes.
    what makes it a stereotype?
    Where have you seen racial stereotypes?
    Define Stereotypes and watch an ad?
    Use Media Literacy Remote Control found in Hobbs page 53
    Stereotype Alert: Allows students to recognize “when people, events, or characters are presented in ways that are so typical they make them seem unreal (Hobbs).
    Solutions Too Easy: warns us about oversimplifying complexity (53).
    Discuss Ad: What’s the implied message (Hobbs 54)
    Write ideas on the blackboard
    ask students to discuss with a partner what is accurate or inaccurate about the racial depiction. How do these depictions affect your view of race?
    Research and write about an accurate depiction of race and how this view came about.
    Have students write another form depicting the character in a modern setting using accurate depictions.

    Works Cited
    Bryant, Jennings, and Dolf Zillmann. Media Effects : Advances In Theory And Research. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Elbaum Associates, 2002. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 10 July 2015.
    Cook, Gareth, and Globe Staff. "SKIN TONES AND RACIAL STEREOTYPING."The Boston Globe (Boston, MA). N.p., 30 Apr. 2002. Web. 15 July 2015.
    Golden, John. "Film and Reading Strategies." Reading in the Dark: Using Film as a Tool in the English Classroom. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English, 2001. pg. 41. Print
    Golden, John. "Appendix B." Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English, 2006. 269. Print.
    Hinton, Kaavonia. ""Sturdy Black Bridges": Discussing Race, Class, and Gender." The English Journal 94.2 (2004): 60. Web.
    Hobbs, Renée. Reading the Media: Media Literacy in High School English. New York: Teachers College, Columbia U, 2007. Print
    Hobbs, Renee. Digital and Media Literacy: Connecting Culture and Classroom. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin, 2011. Print
    Kellner, Douglas, and Jeff Share. "Toward Critical Media Literacy: Core Concepts, Debates, Organizations, and Policy." Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education 26.3 (2005): 369-86. Google Scholar. Web. 5 July 2015.
    Kellner, Douglas, and Jeff Share. "Critical Media Literacy Is Not an Option."Learn Inq Learning Inquiry 1.1 (2007): 59-69. GoogleScholar. Web. 2 July 2015.
    Mallan, Kerry. "Storytelling in the School Curriculum By Kerry Malan."Language Awareness in the Curriculum. By Witold Tulasiewicz and Joseph I. Zajda. Albert Park, Australia: James Nicholas, 1998. N. pag. Print.
    Mastro, Dana E., and Bradley S. Greenberg. "The Portrayal of Racial Minorities on Prime Time Television." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 44.4 (2000): 690-703. Web.
    (view changes)
    10:07 am

Monday, August 10

  1. page Using Film literacy against Racism edited Introduction: ... everyday life real, and seen ... its use, enabling adolescence in this…

    Introduction:
    ...
    everyday life real, and seen
    ...
    its use, enabling adolescence in this time of modeling is an essential timeperiod to help
    ...
    and discussion thatthat, as Hobbs explains,
    ...
    digest the Media’smedia’s portrayal of
    ...
    through media literacy andliteracy, transfer that
    ...
    analysis of literatureliterature, and connect
    Historical Racism in the Media
    ...
    we perceive minorities,minorities which establishes
    Here are a few:
    ...
    Gutierrex, and Chao,Chao was an
    {Screen Shot 2015-07-14 at 6.29.33 PM.png}
    ...
    “Throughout the 1050s1950s and earlier, BlackBlacks were shown
    I love Lucy ( 1951-1957): Desi Arnaz was one of the biggest television personality during this era; however, due to being a minority, his “Latin temperament, which exploded into a torrent of Spanish diatribe was classic imagery” (Clint c. Wilson II, Felix Gutierrez, and Lena M. Chao 88).
    https://video.search.yahoo.com/video/play;_ylt=A2KLqIOEkKVVCzIALOT7w8QF;_ylu=X3oDMTByNDY3bGRuBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDdmlkBHZ0aWQDBGdwb3MDNQ--?p=i+love+lucy+ricky+gets+annoyed&vid=7d22d7b248ec0af3a05b1ad392182dd9&turl=http%3A%2F%2Fts4.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DWN.3cX1XuYUPJniCCFouVo%252bRA%26pid%3D15.1%26h%3D225%26w%3D300%26c%3D7%26rs%3D1&rurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Dg10jFL423ho&tit=I+love+Lucy%3A+english+Pronunciation&c=4&h=225&w=300&l=325&sigr=11b06b0pq&sigt=112bon3n4&sigi=12m6cfaas&age=1356742846&fr2=p%3As%2Cv%3Av&fr=yfp-t-250-s&tt=b
    ...
    The way way we perceive and process one another is a vital factor in our society. Stereotypes are probably the most prevalent form of racism found in our culture, and it manifests itself in a culturally diverse society like America. The concept and idea of stereotypes began to be addressed by Lippmann in his book Public Origins who defined it as, “pictures in our heads" (qtd. in Seiter 16). Seiter elaborates on this definition by saying that based on these images, "we use [them] to apprehend the world around us. They result from a useful and not necessarily undesirable “economy of effort” ( Seiter 16).
    {Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 4.18.57 PM.png}
    ...
    perspective of the cognitive creation of stereotypes.how stereotypes are created cognitively. When we
    ...
    of various facesfaces, they become
    ...
    people group.
    A
    A more modern definition would be defined by thedefinition, according to The American Heritage
    What's the Big Deal?
    ...
    without racial prejudice causingprejudice, which can create a negative effectseffect on society.
    ...
    these symbols, it is important to traintraining adolescents, who
    ...
    in the world.world is a vital task. As Seiter
    How does Film Literacy help analyze stereotypes?
    {Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 4.30.33 PM.png}
    ...
    Cross-discipline helps students not to just analyze a literature book or essay, but to analyze, period. It trains students to
    ...
    to formulate ideaideas surrounding various
    ...
    of minorities.
    Why Media Literacy?

    Media Literacy
    ...
    according to Hobbs,Hobbs are, "linked to
    1.) All Media messages are constructed.
    2.) Media use symbol systems with codes and conventions to shape messages.
    ...
    {Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 4.42.13 PM.png}
    According to Bazalgette, "these concepts are not intended to constitute a list of knowledge or specific content that should be delivered to students, but an initial way of organizing one's thinking about the media" (qtd. in Reading the Media 41). It is not "Brainwashing", but helping students to develop critical thinking skills in order to interpret correctly the way racial images are displayed on T.V.
    ...
    influence means thatthat, tentatively, the
    ...
    Literacy against RacismRacism?
    In Reading the Media: Media Literacy in High School English, Postman states, “media literacy reflects the acknowledge task of the schools to assist the young in interpreting the symbols of their culture (qtd. in Hobbs 6). It is no doubt that learning to interpret the symbols of various race is an essential element in living intelligently in a diverse society. When Students think about the various races represented on Television and Film, it is important that they learn to interpret it correctly as they interact with the plethora of cultures in reality. According to David Buckingham, “very different conceptions of morality and very different cultural traditions exist side-by-side” (qtd. in Reading the Media Hobbs 29). Using Literacy to analyze and write about how race is represented, how it deviates from the truth, and how it should represent different cultures, is an essential element to train students to play a healthy, active role in society.
    Activity #1: Addressing the issue by Discussion.
    It is an essentialThe first component is to begin
    {Screen Shot 2015-07-21 at 4.55.51 PM.png}
    Transition by reading the Boston Globe article Skin Tone and Racial Stereo Types by Gareth Cook. A link to it can be found here: {Boston Globe article.pdf}
    Discuss the issue of race and people's perspective of race elaborated in the article. Be open and honest about it.
    ...
    the article, Whywhy does Skin Toneskin tone affect our
    2.) The article states that we should talk about these issues in order for us to get beyond them. Why is this so essential?
    3.) How have your attitudes been shaped towards race and skin color by shows and other media forms?
    The essential element of discussion is a valuable way to begin since, according to Rothenberg, "the ways in which differences in race/ethnicity have been constructed hierarchically...Doing so will inevitably open up the course to other voices and new perspectives" (72).
    Activity #3: Analyzing Stereotypes in Ads.
    ...
    these commercials depiction of racism are subtle, sosubtle and tend to be rooted out of ignorance; however, they can still affect perception and offend others. Due to their subtle nature, these commercials tend to
    ...
    bit more controversial due to thecontroversial, so there are much arguments surrounding
    ...
    to introduce and continue the discussion of race and stereo types:
    1.)
    what is a stereotypes, studentsstereotypes?
    2.) What are your
    experience with stereo types, and iftypes
    3.) When you first experienced
    these Ads are Racistads, what were your impressions? Are these ads racist or are we just a hypersensitive culture. Why should we care?
    {Screen Shot 2015-08-04 at 11.46.11 AM.png}
    Activity #2: Addressing the issue by film analysis
    ...
    Literal Meaning
    Metaphorical Meaning
    ...
    class symbols.
    2.)
    These allows them to filter and apply these skills as a cross-discipline for other forms of media
    1.)
    Have students
    ...
    story of Paul,Paul with these questions and thoughts in mind to help them write.
    *what is
    his journey through various communities, howcommunities?
    *how do the
    the various communities in the film perceive the minority, how far itminority?
    *how far/similar
    is his experience from reality, and howreality?
    *how
    accurate is the director's view is in regards
    ...
    of the minority.minority?
    2.) Throughout
    ...
    media and in their lives.
    ...
    helps students, reflect"reflect on their
    Activity # 3: addressing the issue through post viewing discussion:
    After the film, analyze the perceptions of race with these questions by KaaVonia Hinton
    ...
    2. How do characters resist race, class, and gender oppression?
    3. How do characters express a philosophy of liberation by assisting and encouraging themselves and others in efforts to prevail over multiple oppressions (racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, and so forth)?
    ...
    approach to learning”learning, which then
    ...
    students to “reflectreflect on the
    Activity #5: Connecting symbols to literature.
    As a post-viewing activity
    Give time for students to share their stories and their journey. This is essential since, "students can be assisted in gaining a broader understanding of themselves and others if we create space in our classrooms for their stories..life experiences are woven into the fabric of the school community." (Mallan 135).
    Literary connection: To Kill a MockingBird
    ...
    the individual characters Calpurnia and Tom Robinson.characters.
    1.) Are
    ...
    book depicts these charactersCalpurnia and Tom Robinson and the
    2.) Analyze the perception of the racist, Bob Ewell, Link Deas, Mr. Walter Cunningham.
    ...
    similarities/contrast in how the perception
    ...
    of Separation? Explain.
    3.) Analyze the characters and perceptions of Scout and Atticus Finch, Boo Radley, Dill Harris, and Heck Tate.
    ...
    characters and the characters in the film, Ouisa Kittredge, Flan Kittredge,Kittredge and their
    ...
    class of friends.friends? How do
    Using Media Literacy to detect Stereotypes or racial misrepresentation in advertisement.
    Discuss what students think and believe are racial stereotypes.
    ...
    Seiter, Ellen. "Stereotypes and the Media: A Re-evaluation." J Communication Journal of Communication 36.2 (1986): 14-26. Web.
    Six Degrees of Separation. Dir. Fred Schepisi. Perf. Will Smith, Stockard Channing, and Donald Sutherland. 1993. DVD.
    "Stereotypes." The American Heritage Dictionary. N.p.: Turtleback, 2012. Print.
    Tate, Stacie L. "Media Literacy." Handbook of Research on Teaching the English Language Arts Co-Sponsored by the International Reading Association and the National Council of Teachers of English (2013): 182-187. Web.
    Rothenberg, Paula. "Beyond the Food Court: Goals and Strategies for Teaching Multiculturalism." Feminist Teacher 13.1 (2000): 61-73. JSTOR. Web. 20 July 2015.
    Ward, L. Monique. "Wading Through the Stereotypes: Positive and Negative Associations Between Media Use and Black Adolescents' Conceptions of Self." Developmental Psychology 40.2 (2004): 284-94. J. Store. Web. 6 July 2015.
    Wilson, Clint C., Félix Gutiérrez, and Lena M. Chao. Racism, Sexism, and the Media: Multicultural Issues into the New Communications Age. Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications, 2013. Print.

    (view changes)
    7:23 am

Tuesday, August 4

  1. page Using Film literacy against Racism edited ... How do we Use Media Literacy against Racism In Reading the Media: Media Literacy in High Scho…
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    How do we Use Media Literacy against Racism
    In Reading the Media: Media Literacy in High School English, Postman states, “media literacy reflects the acknowledge task of the schools to assist the young in interpreting the symbols of their culture (qtd. in Hobbs 6). It is no doubt that learning to interpret the symbols of various race is an essential element in living intelligently in a diverse society. When Students think about the various races represented on Television and Film, it is important that they learn to interpret it correctly as they interact with the plethora of cultures in reality. According to David Buckingham, “very different conceptions of morality and very different cultural traditions exist side-by-side” (qtd. in Reading the Media Hobbs 29). Using Literacy to analyze and write about how race is represented, how it deviates from the truth, and how it should represent different cultures, is an essential element to train students to play a healthy, active role in society.
    Activity #1: Discuss.Addressing the issue by Discussion.
    It is an essential component to begin to discuss student's’ view on race and various culture in the media. Hobbs states, “Listening and asking questions are the most important practices that activate critical thinking in the high school classroom” (Digital and Media Literacy 33). Understanding students’ views allows teachers to distance from their authoritative perception of what to believe. It allows students to articulate their understanding, their lack of experience, and their desire to learn. Establishing this mode of critical thinking is an essential step to autonomous thinking about accurate depiction of race and stereotypes in the media. Rothenberg states, "if educators avoid discussing issues around race, class, and gender, there will be little hope of coming close to working toward a just and equitable society" (qtd. in oKaa Vonia Hinton 63).
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    Begin asking these questions:
    1.) what makes it a stereotype?
    2.) Where have you seen racial stereotypes?
    3.) Define Stereotypes and watch an ad?

    Transition by reading the Boston Globe article Skin Tone and Racial Stereo Types by Gareth Cook. A link to it can be found here: {Boston Globe article.pdf}
    Discuss the issue of race and people's perspective of race elaborated in the article. Be open and honest about it.
    1.) Have you been guilty ofFrom the things the study shows?
    2.)
    article, Why does Skin Tone affect our perception of others?
    2.) The article states that we should talk about these issues in order for us to get beyond them. Why is this so essential?
    3.)
    How have
    ...
    media forms?
    The

    The
    essential element
    ...
    new perspectives" ( 72).(72).
    Activity #2:
    Watch Six Degrees
    #3: Analyzing Stereotypes in Ads.
    Is It Racist? Many Ads that are considered racist tend to walk a fine line between innocent advertisement and vivid stereotypes. Many
    of separation. Herethese commercials are some valuable questionssubtle, so they tend to helpbe a bit more controversial due to the arguments surrounding the question if it really is racist. Use these Ads to introduce what is a stereotypes, students experience with stereo types, and if these Ads are Racist or just a hypersensitive culture.
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    Activity #2: Addressing the issue by film analysis
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    1.) Use Symbol Tally Sheet. (Golden 165).
    TitleFilm
    Object
    #
    of Visual
    References
    #
    Of Dialogue References
    Literal Meaning
    Metaphorical Meaning
    Use activity to look for not only racial symbols, but literary symbols as a whole. Allow student to
    analyze perceptionsthe piece first as literature, but keep in mind the distinct racial and class symbols.
    2.) Have students map in their Notebook the story
    of racePaul, his journey through various communities, how the various communities perceive the minority, how far it is from reality, and how accurate the director's view is in regards to the depiction of the minority.
    2.) Throughout
    the film and discussion have students keep a journal. Allow the students to write in the journal how they have perceived various races in media and their lives. If students feel comfortable, allow them to read it out loud. The activity of writing helps students, reflect on their experiences consuming media...[it] encourage[s] students to broaden their reading about topics related to the course and reflect upon their media use at home" (Reading the Media Hobbs 82).
    Activity # 3: addressing the issue through post viewing discussion:
    After the film, analyze the perceptions of race with these questions
    by KaaVonia
    1. How are the interlocking oppressions of race, class, and gender at work in the lives of the characters?
    2. How do characters resist race, class, and gender oppression?
    3. How do characters express a philosophy of liberation by assisting and encouraging themselves and others in efforts to prevail over multiple oppressions (racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, and so forth)?
    * HaveHave students write in their journals about how they have perceived various minorities in their journal. If they feel comfortable, have them read it out loud.
    * Have students to keep writing about various perspective of race they observe in media in their journal. This activity helps students to, " reflect
    essays on their experiences consuming media...[it] encourage[s] students to broaden their reading about topics related to the course and reflect upon their media use at home" (Reading the Media Hobbs 82).
    * Frequently re-visit these questions and have students write essays around
    these questions
    ...
    their language ofand thoughts on the issueissue. As Renee
    ...
    50).
    Activity #3#5: Connecting symbols to literature.
    As a post-viewing activity
    GiverGive time for
    ...
    connection: To killKill a mockingbird:
    Though
    MockingBird
    Though
    this is
    ...
    in mainstream medi.media. Read the
    ...
    analyze the depiction ofindividual characters Calpurnia and Tom Robinson.
    Analyze

    1.) Are there in similarities/contrast between how the book depicts these characters and the depiction of Paul, his community, and his friends.
    2.) Analyze
    the perception
    ...
    Walter Cunningham.
    Are there any similarities/contrast in how the perception of the characters in Six Degrees of Separation?
    3.) Analyze the characters and perceptions of Scout and Atticus Finch, Boo Radley, Dill Harris, and Heck Tate.
    What are the similarities between these characters and Ouisa Kittredge, Flan Kittredge, and their social class of friends. How do their perceptions of Paul differ from the Atticus's family's perception of Tom Robinson. What changes for the characters of Ouisa, Flan, and how they perceive and accept Paul?

    Using Media Literacy to detect Stereotypes or racial misrepresentation in advertisement.
    Discuss what students think and believe are racial stereotypes.
    ...
    ask students to discuss with a partner what is accurate or inaccurate about the racial depiction. How do these depictions affect your view of race?
    Research and write about an accurate depiction of race and how this view came about.
    Application on a film and text
    Here are several films displaying several ethnicities. Building discussion around these races, analyzing them, and applying these views could help students to thoughtfully interpret media.
    To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). Though this is a classic novel addressing civil rights issues, and the movie, “embodies lessons of respect” (Welsch and Adams 192), it is still filmed in the heyday of stereotypical images of minorities. Addressing these images could help students separate what is racist, what is a stereotype, and what is a historical depiction.
    Activity #1:
    Use Rothenberg's questions to spark discussion and transition to the topic as a pre-viewing activity.
    1.) "Whose view dominates this course?" 2.) "What questions are not raised by these readings that might be raised if other voices/cultures/perspectives were included?" (Rothenberg 72). 3.) "How have are literature books depicted the various races in our country" Why? How does that make you feel?"
    Post-viewing activities:
    Have students write essays on a specific media text reflecting on the use of stereotypes in the media. An example would be an essay about racial stereotypes in The Wayans Brothers ( Hobbs 82).
    Activity # 2
    Watch the film Six Degrees of Separation: Have students map in their book the story of the minority, his journey through various communities, how the various communities perceive the minority, how far it is from reality, and how accurate the director's view is in regards to the depiction of the minority.
    Giver time for students to share their stories and their journey. This is essential since, "students can be assisted in gaining a broader understanding of themselves and others if we create space in our classrooms for their stories..life experiences are woven into the fabric of the school community" (Mallan 135)

    Have students write another form depicting the character in a modern setting using accurate depictions.
    Works Cited
    ...
    Ward, L. Monique. "Wading Through the Stereotypes: Positive and Negative Associations Between Media Use and Black Adolescents' Conceptions of Self." Developmental Psychology 40.2 (2004): 284-94. J. Store. Web. 6 July 2015.
    Wilson, Clint C., Félix Gutiérrez, and Lena M. Chao. Racism, Sexism, and the Media: Multicultural Issues into the New Communications Age. Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications, 2013. Print.

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